Brandt Junceau _ VANDAL

 

Sigmund Freud Museum, 17 October 2014 – 4 October 2015

 

The work of New York artist Brandt Junceau will be shown in Austria for the first time, in the Sigmund Freud Museum special exhibition VANDAL. This will be the first time that a special exhibition will be staged in Freud's former professional rooms.

By replacing historical losses inside the former Freud apartment, the artist interferes with history, not unlike a vandal, and Freud's "archaeological metaphor" is exposed as the means of both scientific discovery and poetic construction. 
 

 

 

 

 

 

Freud’s travels. Cultural experience – psychoanalytical thought

Sigmund Freud Museum, 7/3/2014 to 5/10/2014, extended to 4 October, 2015 with intervention "Vandal" by Brandt Junceau

The special exhibition “Freud’s travels. Cultural experience – psychoanalytical thought”, opening at the Sigmund Freud Museum on 7 March 2014, focuses on the numerous journeys which Sigmund Freud undertook for business and pleasure. To mark the 75th anniversary of Freud’s death on 23 September 2014, the show takes a look at the forced flight from the National Socialists to England. The outcome of this final journey was that he died not in his home city, but in London. Exile, as he observed, allowed him “to die in freedom”.

The exhibition also centres on the Freud family’s move from Příbor to Vienna, the first journey of the three-year-old Sigmund, tours of ancient sites in Italy and Greece, and his lecture trip by ship to the US East Coast in 1909. For the first time, a concentrated array of documents and pictures of his stays in the country and abroad will be on show in Freud’s former private rooms. While the permanent exhibition provides insights into Sigmund Freud’s work in his study rooms – his “cave of memory” – the special exhibition highlights the central role which various locations around the world played in his life. With the aid of objects set to go on show to the public for the first time ever, the task of the exhibition is to study travel not only as a recreational and enjoyable experience, but also its significance in terms of Freud’s theoretical work, thus panning out completely new perspectives on his holidays and working trips.

The period from the mid-1890s to the beginning of the First World War in 1914 marks the climax of Freud’s travel activities. Several weeks of holidaying with the family in the Austrian Alps or Bavaria were usually followed by extensive tours in the company of members of the family or colleagues. As an avid devotee of classical culture, Sigmund Freud visited Italy and Greece many times; his trips also took him to Croatia, England and the Netherlands, and, in 1909, to the United States. In 1938 the family fled from the National Socialists via Paris to London, where he died at the age of eighty-three on 23 September 1939. His holidays and childhood travel impressions influenced the formation of his theories and constitute an important factor in the development of psychoanalysis.

 

Brandt Junceau _ VANDAL

 

Sigmund Freud Museum, 17 October 2014 – 4 October 2015

daily 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SIGALIT LANDAU _ COMPRESSED HOUSEHOLD 1996 - 2010

 

Sigmund Freud Museum , Schauraum Berggasse 19, 6 November 2014 - 22 April 2015

 

The Israeli artist Sigalit Landau spent the first years of her life on the border to the Arab part of Jerusalem, in Philadelphia and in London, before returning to Israel at the age of ten in 1979. The everyday politics of Israel and the family history of her predecessors from Vienna and Bukovina form the artist’s starting point and centre of gravity. Numerous of Landau’s works of installation and performance revolve around such topics as nomadism, borders, community and (loss of) memory. Both individual and collective experiences become manifest in her artistic works. Comparable with psychoanalytical work, Landau uses memory as a device that helps the unconscious allow things to rest, to forget.

 

“Compressed Household” visualises the Janus-faced aspect of memories: fragility and oppressive burden. Two rods press personal objects from her parents’ household effects together, at the same time holding them in the balance.

Courtesy: Pommeranz Collection

SIGALIT LANDAU _ COMPRESSED HOUSEHOLD 1996 - 2010

Sigmund Freud Museum, Schauraum Berggasse 19, 6 November 2014 - 22 April 2015, free access